Gambling Disorders 360°

Exploring the latest news, issues and research relating to gambling disorders and responsible gaming

Research Update

New Volume of Increasing the Odds Explores Self-Exclusion Research

by: Institute Staff | Oct 15, 2010

The National Center for Responsible Gaming (NCRG) recently released the fifth volume of Increasing the Odds: A Series Dedicated to Understanding Gambling Disorders, which is titled “Evaluating Self-Exclusion as an Intervention for Disordered Gambling.”  The NCRG’s monograph series provides easy-to-understand summaries of seminal peer-reviewed research on gambling disorders, as well as implications for future research and prevention efforts.

Read More »

Posted in:

IAGA/IAGR Session on “The Science of Gaming Regulations”

by: Institute Staff | Oct 14, 2010

On Tuesday, Oct. 12, the National Center for Responsible Gaming (NCRG) hosted a session for regulators and advisors at the 2010 International Association of Gaming Advisors (IAGA)/International Association of Gaming Regulations (IAGR) International Conference in Washington, D.C. The session, titled, “The Science of Gaming Regulations: Testing the Effectiveness of Regulations Designed to Reduce Gambling-related Harms,” featured a panel of experts who discussed the importance of scientific research in the development and evaluation of international gaming regulations designed to reduce gambling-related harms.

Read More »

Posted in:

The Internet Gambling Debate: Is Research the Missing Ingredient?

by: Institute Staff | Sep 30, 2010

The “Room for Debate” section of The New York Times recently posed the question, “Should Internet gambling be legalized?” Several respondents identified an increase in gambling addiction as the probable outcome if Congress lifts the current ban on online gambling in the United States. The belief that the easy access and social isolation of Internet gambling make it an especially risky behavior has become conventional wisdom.

Read More »

Posted in:

Drug Treatments for Adolescents with Gambling Problems?

by: Institute Staff | Aug 25, 2010

A new review article from the principal investigators of the NCRG Centers of Excellence in Gambling Research at Yale University and the University of Minnesota explores the potential of pharmacological treatments for disordered gambling in adolescents. It is important to identify an effective treatment for this age group, as adolescents are at a higher risk for developing gambling-related problems than adults.  However, no drug trials focused on pathological gambling have been conducted with this age group.

Read More »

Posted in:

New Research Finds Problem Gambling Peaks in Young Adulthood

by: Institute Staff | Aug 4, 2010

A new study from the Research Institute on Addictions at the University of Buffalo published in the Journal of Gambling Studies combined two national surveys to examine gambling and gambling problems across the lifespan, from the teenage years to retirement-age. The authors found that gambling involvement, frequent gambling (defined as gambling 52 times per year or more) and problem gambling increased during the teens, peaked in the 20s and 30s, and then declined in adults older than 40.

Read More »

Posted in:

Impulse Control Disorders and Parkinson’s Disease: What’s the Connection?

by: Institute Staff | Jul 19, 2010

In recent years, reports about Parkinson’s disease patients engaging in excessive gambling have cropped up in the news. Several lawsuits against pharmaceutical companies have been filed by individuals claiming that the drug treatments for Parkinson’s disease caused them to develop gambling disorders, sex addiction and other impulse control disorders. So, what is the connection between disordered gambling behavior and a degenerative disorder of the central nervous system that often impairs the sufferer’s motor skills and speech? We asked Dr.

Read More »

Posted in:

Louisiana Treatment Center is a Model for State-funded Programs

by: Institute Staff | Jun 8, 2010

Inpatient treatment programs have been helping people with substance-use disorders for decades, but only recently have they been used in the treatment of pathological gambling. The Louisiana Center of Recovery (CORE) was one of the first inpatient treatment facilities dedicated to treating disordered gambling. The following is an excerpt from the article, “Louisiana Treatment Center is a Model for State-Funded Programs,” which was originally published in the spring 2010 edition of Responsible Gaming Quarterly.

In June of 1999, the state of Louisiana’s Office for Addictive Disorders, with support from the Louisiana Association on Compulsive Gambling and the state’s casinos and gaming companies, opened a one-of-a-kind residential treatment center for those suffering from pathological gambling. It was called the Center of Recovery (CORE) and, at that time, was the only state-funded center with a primary focus on treating gambling disorders.

“There was a visionary thinker, Jake Hadley, in the Office for Addictive Disorders, and he felt that pathological gambling was a major public health concern for the citizens of Louisiana,” said CORE executive director Reece Middleton. “He wanted to address the problem in a proactive fashion, and thought those affected would benefit most from a residential treatment facility.”

Read More »

Posted in:

New Research Examines Gender Differences in Disordered Gambling, Natural Recovery and Treatment Seeking

by: Institute Staff | May 27, 2010

Do men and women have the same experience with gambling problems or with recovery? Or, are there gender differences that have been observed in studies of other addictive behaviors? The following is an excerpt from the article, “New Study Explores Gender Differences in Treatment-Seeking, Recovery,” which was originally published in the spring 2010 edition of Responsible Gaming Quarterly.

Women are more likely than men to seek treatment for and recover from pathological gambling, although the vast majority of people are able to recover from pathological gambling without formal treatment, according to a new study published in Twin Research and Human Genetics.

The study, conducted by Wendy S. Slutske from the University of Missouri, Alex Blaszczynski from the University of Sydney and Nicholas G. Martin from the Queensland Institute of Medical Research, is the first ever to document gender differences in treatment-seeking and recovery from pathological gambling. Participants in the study were 4,764 members of the Australian Twin Registry Cohort II sample.

Read More »

Posted in:

New Research on the Impact of Having a Parent with Gambling Problems

by: Institute Staff | May 19, 2010

The following is an excerpt from the article, “All in the Family: New Research on the Impact of Having a Parent with Gambling Problems,” which was originally published in the spring 2010 edition of Responsible Gaming Quarterly.

Scientists and clinicians have long speculated that gambling disorders are more prevalent in families with a history of problem gambling behavior. The role that heredity plays in the development of a gambling disorder is important to research focused on the causes of the disorder and to assessment and treatment. Research has started to unravel the genetic versus environmental factors. A University of Minnesota study, “Characteristics of Pathological Gamblers with a Problem Gambling Parent,” recently published in The American Journal on Addiction, is the first attempt to determine whether having a problem gambling parent is associated with any unique clinical features in adults with pathological gambling (PG) (Schreiber, Odlaug, Kim, & Grant, 2009).

Read More »

Posted in:

Researchers Explore How Attitudes, Intentions and Peer Behaviors Influence the Gambling Behavior of College Students

by: Institute Staff | May 6, 2010

A recently published study in Psychology of Addictive Behaviors highlights how gambling behavior among college students can be influenced by their own attitudes and intentions toward gambling, as well as their perceptions of the norms for family and friends regarding gambling.

The 2009 report of the Task Force on College Gambling Policies called for more research to help colleges and universities develop evidence-based programs to prevent and reduce gambling problems among students. This newly published study, “Using the theory of planned behavior to predict gambling behavior,” offers a promising approach for developing responsible gaming initiatives targeted at this population.

Read More »

Posted in:

Connect

Connect with the National Center for Responsible Gaming (NCRG) for the latest news on gambling disorders and responsible gaming.

NCRG on Facebook NCRG on Twitter NCRG on SlideShare

Search Blog

Subscribe

Delivered by FeedBurner