Gambling Disorders 360°

Exploring the latest news, issues and research relating to gambling disorders and responsible gaming

Research Update

NCRG-funding Application Deadline: Letters of Intent for Large Grants and NCRG Centers of Excellence are Due March 1

by: NCRG Staff | Feb 21, 2012

The March 1, 2012 deadline to submit letters of intent to apply to become an NCRG Center of Excellence in Gambling Research and to apply for Large Grants from the NCRG is right around the corner. The NCRG has allocated more than $1.5 million to fund research that advances our understanding about gambling disorders in 2012, and deadlines for two of those opportunities are quickly approaching. Make sure you submit your letter of intent for these two funding opportunities soon!

Read More »

Posted in:

NCRG Announces Availability of $1.5 Million in Research Grants

by: NCRG Staff | Jan 31, 2012

The National Center for Responsible Gaming is pleased to announce it has allocated more than $1.5 million for grants in support of research on prevention and treatment of gambling disorders in 2012. This is the largest amount of research dollars allocated for project grants in the organization’s 15-year history. The grants, ranging from $1,500 to $402,500, will be awarded on a competitive basis.

Read More »

Posted in:

Rates of Gambling Disorders in Iowa Mirror National Estimates

by: NCRG Staff | Dec 2, 2011

In October the Iowa Department of Public Health released a statewide report on gambling behavior and gambling disorders (Gonnerman & Lutz, 2011). Using the NODS instrument[1] the study found the rate of pathological gambling (PG), the most severe form of the disorder, in the past 12 months to be 0.3 percent. Using the PGSI instrument, researchers found that past-year rates of PG to be 0.6 percent. These rates are similar to the prevalence rate found in large-scale national surveys, such as the National Comorbidity Survey Replication (NCS-R) that reported a past-year rate for pathological gambling of 0.3 percent (Kessler et al., 2008). The Iowa report used two screening measures to collect data: the National Opinion Research Center’s DSM Screen (NODS) (Gerstein et al., 1999) and the Problem Gambling Severity Index (PGSI), a validated brief measure based on the  Canadian Problem Gambling Severity Index (CPGI) (Ferris & Wynne, 2001).

Read More »

Posted in:

New Study Supports Need for College-based Resources on Gambling Disorders

by: NCRG Staff | Nov 1, 2011

In 2009, the NCRG’s Task Force on College Gambling Policies recommended that colleges and universities promote understanding of gambling disorders as a mental health issue and provide assessment and intervention resources to address gambling disorders among college students. To assist schools with this recommendation and provide science-based tools to address gambling and gambling-related harms on college campuses, the NCRG launched www.CollegeGambling.org, a comprehensive online resource, in March 2011.

Research shows that approximately 75 percent of college students gambled during the past year, whether legally or illegally. Researchers from Montclair State University  recently published a study about problem gambling awareness messages on college counseling center websites (CCW) to determine what types of information students received about gambling disorders and treatment (McKinley & Wright, 2011). This study further highlights the need for resources like CollegeGambling.org.

Read More »

Posted in:

Research Update on Gambling Disorders: Self-regulation

by: NCRG Staff | Sep 26, 2011

Responsible gaming programs typically advise gamblers to set a budget for time and money spent gambling and other self-management techniques designed to avoid problems with gambling. Research is now beginning to examine the types of strategies used by recreational gamblers and people with gambling problems. A new study from Australia demonstrates this trend (Moore et al., 2011).

Read More »

Posted in:

Can Gaming Employees Identify Gambling Problems in their Customers?

by: NCRG Staff | Sep 7, 2011

Is it possible for gaming floor employees to tell the difference between their patrons who gamble responsibly and those who have a gambling disorder? A recently published Australian study that was featured in the August 10 edition of The WAGER observed that while there are visible indicators of gambling problems (e.g. gambling for long periods of time, using ATMs, placing high risk bets and avoiding social contact), gaming venue staff are not very accurate in their estimation of who has a gambling problem and who does not (Delfabbro, Osborn, Nevile, Skelt, & McMillen, 2007; Schellinck & Schrans, 2004 and Delfabbro, Borgas, & King, 2011). Visible indicators (e.g.  gambling for long periods of time, using ATMs, placing high risk bets and avoiding social contact) may not be the most reliable form of identifying problematic gambling behavior (Delfabbro, Osborn, Nevile, Skelt, & McMillen, 2007; Schellinck & Schrans, 2004). Future research is needed to lead to better employee training that will help identify problematic gambling.

Read More »

Posted in:

Bridging the Gap Between Research and Clinicians on Treatment Options

by: NCRG Staff | Aug 4, 2011

How do clinicians determine an appropriate treatment plan for clients with gambling problems? The current dearth of research on treatment outcomes and the lack of a treatment standard make this a challenge for treatment providers. However, Dr. Jon Grant argues that new research will bridge the gap, allowing clinicians to select the most effective treatment options based on cognitive, neuroimaging and genetic data. Dr. Grant, professor of psychiatry at the University of Minnesota and principal investigator of the NCRG Center of Excellence in Gambling Research at the University of Minnesota, delivered a keynote address on this topic at the 8th Annual Midwest Conference on Problem Gambling and Substance Abuse on July 20 in Kansas City, Mo.

Read More »

Posted in:

Revolutions in the Study of Gambling Disorders: Howard Shaffer at the NCPG Conference, Part 2

by: NCRG Staff | Aug 4, 2011

Part two of the series recapping Dr. Howard Shaffer’s keynote address at the 25th National Conference on Problem Gambling in Boston, Mass. To read part one of the Gambling Disorders 360° series, click here.

After laying the foundation for his presentation by outlining the theoretical revolutions that have defined our understanding of gambling disorders, Dr. Howard Shaffer then proposed that the next revolution in understanding gambling disorders will come from the way online gambling behavior can now be studied. Until recently, information about people’s gambling behavior has come almost exclusively from self-report (asking a person questions about their past gambling behaviors). Self-report is considered to be acceptably accurate by the scientific community, but it relies on recollections of individuals that may be influenced by a variety of factors such as desire to please interviewers or to downplay losses. For years these problems with self-reported data have presented a challenge to researchers studying gambling disorders. However, Dr. Shaffer suggested that new innovations in research methods will decrease the role of self-report and allow researchers to look directly at the gambling behavior of online gamblers.

Read More »

Posted in:

Revolutions in the Study of Gambling Disorders: Howard Shaffer at the NCPG Conference

by: NCRG Staff | Aug 3, 2011

As we have mentioned on Gambling Disorders 360˚, the NCRG staff has been attending and speaking at various conferences and meetings this summer. The first one of the summer was the National Conference on Problem Gambling on July 1-2.

This is the first post in a two-part series about the July 1 keynote address by Dr. Howard Shaffer. Dr. Shaffer, whose publications and research reviews we have featured previously on Gambling Disorders 360˚, is an associate professor of psychiatry at Harvard Medical School and director of the Division on Addictions at The Cambridge Health Alliance, a Harvard Medical School teaching affiliate. His talk was entitled “Scientific Revolutions: Understanding Gambling Disorders” in the spirit of the conference theme, “Celebrating 25 Years: Revolutionary Changes and Emerging Innovations” (Shaffer, 2011).

Read More »

Posted in:

New Research Evaluates the Effectiveness of a Casino’s Responsible Gaming Training for New Employees

by: NCRG Staff | Jul 8, 2011

The people who work in casinos and other gaming venues are an important and under-researched group in the pathological gambling literature. Gaming employees constitute a unique group not only because they interact daily with customers in casinos, but because they are slightly more vulnerable to gambling disorders than the general population (Shaffer, Vander Bilt, & Hall, 1999). Because of these and other factors, most states and casino operators in the U.S. require gaming employees to go through training on the specifics of disordered gambling and responsible gaming.  However, there has been very little published research done on the effectiveness of employee training programs used by casinos. In fact, the first study of an employee training program by a U.S. research team was recently published in the Journal of Gambling Studies (Laplante, Gray, Labrie, Kleschinsky, & Shaffer, 2011). 

Read More »

Posted in:

Connect

Connect with the National Center for Responsible Gaming (NCRG) for the latest news on gambling disorders and responsible gaming.

NCRG on Facebook NCRG on Twitter NCRG on SlideShare

Search Blog

Subscribe

Delivered by FeedBurner